The anatomy for decision making for a boat

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The anatomy for decision making for a boat

Postby baz on Sun Sep 23, 2018 1:28 pm

Subject: The anatomy for decision making for a boat

I'm close to deciding on my 4th boat and it has caused me to think back some 10 years on how my decision making was influenced and arrived at for each boat selection.

I'm sure most people over time will not be able to predict their futures and this aspect will affect what choices are made in purchasing a boat.

In summary this is how it went for me....

R-21EC (nixed) > R-25 Classic (purchased) > R-27 Classic (nixed) > R-25 Classic (sold) > R-21EC (purchased and later traded) > R-27/OB (maybe to be traded) > R-29 S (possibly my next boat).

Back in 2008/2009 I came across the R-21EC on a trailer at my local gas station. It was on its way to be delivered to its new owner by Jeff Messmer. I viewed the boat up and down with awe and saw it as a suitable boat for the PNW waters. I chatted with Jeff and later decided my 1st Mate and I would travel down to the Kent factory to get a closer look at the R-21EC. We both were excited about this. Upon arriving at the Kent factory we were introduced to the R-21EC and I personally liked it and it was well within my boat budget. However, 1st Mate was not that thrilled and found it too small to be comfortable. Now this sense 1st mate had was strongly being influenced by the fact that a R-25 Classic was on a trailer adjacent to the R-21EC and I could see 1st Mate kept looking over to it as I was viewing the R-21EC. So.... we eventually got onboard the R-25 Classic which was on the face of it at or a bit above my budget, but nonetheless I also was interested to see what the R-25 Classic had to offer compared to the R-21EC. In short, 1st Mate declared that if we were to buy a boat it simply had to be the R-25 Classic. The attraction to the R-25 Classic was its vastly superior cabin facilities and sleeping accommodations. To me also, was the fact that the R-25 Classic was more of a boat than the skinny sparse creature comforts offered on the R-21EC. 1st Mate and I quickly came to an agreement on the R-25 Classic purchase and some months later we took ownership of one. The point about the decision made here was that even though I was enthusiastic about the R-21EC and it being easily within my budget, my 1st Mate's idea of what she considered to be a boat she could live with quickly trump my thoughts about buying the R-21EC. When boating is for two people and married as we were, It is obviously and rightfully so, that it takes two to buy a boat in a case such as ours. Each has a right to have their opinions taking into account.

We enjoyed our R-25 Classic for some 6-7 years and put quite a few cruising hours on the boat. I made substantial mods to make the boat more to our taste over these years. Sadly, 1st Mate's health started to wane and we found less and less time to enjoy boating. At one point I considered the R-27 Classic as an upgrade thinking this might make things better for 1st Mate's comfort. This did not materialize as the upgrade cost was not be acceptable and improved comfort for 1st Mate of the R-27 Classic over what the R-25 Classic had simply wasn't sufficient enough.

We ended up selling the R-25 Classic thinking our boating adventures had come to an end.

1st Mate's health continued to wane.

However, around 2016 we both decided (and I was still lusting on boating) we could continue boating on a day-trip basis using the R-21EC on a nearby lake primarily. The R-21EC was trailerable using our current auto. We moved forward with this and bought ourselves the R-21EC (my original choice for a boat). We spent some 18 months running about the lake for day trips and made the odd trailering up to ports closer to the PNW San Juan islands to cruise about the islands. All went well for awhile, but I got bored with the lake trips and moved the boat to the Puget Sound open waters and to a Marina close to home (just 5 minutes away) hoping we could boat to places around the local PNW destinations. However, I quickly realized the R-21EC running at some 6 to 7 kts would take ages to get to places, and 1st Mate's declining health was requiring cruise times to be minimal.... what was I to do ?

Well, along came the 2017 R-23/OB and the 2018 R-27/OB between 2016-2017 timeframe. I sped over to Bremerton boat show in May 2017 to get a look at the R-23/OB and R-27/OB. At first the R-23/OB seemed to be the sensible choice but with the R-27/OB being docked next to the R-23/OB I found that from a cost perspective when adding the options I wanted for the R-23/OB the final price tag of the R-23/OB started to approach what one would pay for the R-27/OB that had all the options I wanted to begin with. I ended up plonking my deposit down on the table in front of Andrew for the new 2018 R-27/OB. Come Aug 2017 we had traded our R-21EC in for the R-27/OB.

The maiden voyage for our R-27/OB was to Port Townsend WA (some 31 miles north) via a stop at Marrowstone Island WA from Edmonds WA. The waters were calm and the R-27/OB took us to our destinations in around 60 minutes. 1st Mate was very pleased. Our stay at Port Townsend was for 2 days before returning to our home port of Edmonds. 1st Mate although very pleased with the speed of the R-27/OB was not so enthusiastic about the sleeping comfort of the R-27/OB as it was still the difficult to crawl into the closed in V-berth arrangement. The head being adjacent to the V-berth was a huge positive though as no struggling to the aft section of the cabin as in our earlier R-25 Classic boat.

We continued to cruise the R-27/OB for around a year from Aug 2017. 1st Mate's health took a dramatic turn and we cruised less and less together and she suddendly passed away in early Aug 2018.

Now that I'm widowed my desire to continue boating has not changed but the kind of boat I need isn't necessarily what the R-27/OB offers. The need for speed as required by my 1st Mate is no longer needed, although I do like speed at times. I'm likely to now spend time anchored for a number of nights, want the company of family and grandkids with me on cruises and possible take extended cruises all about the PNW and up into the Canadian waters and even "North to Alaska". The R-27/OB is a fine boat but does not offer the same ride qualities of a larger boat for a range of sea conditions we have in the PNW year round. I like to boat year round in calm and not so calm seas and the R-27/OB is limiting in this regards as it cannot achieve its best speeds and fuel economies at all times with this requirement.

So I'm now looking seriously at the R-29 S boat.

All of the above simply points to the fact that continued boating and with what type of boat largely depends on personal circumstances that unfold with time and cannot be predicted. One has to adapt and choose a boat accordingly as best one can.

Of course this is my story I share and yours may be different.
Barry & Jake-Wire Hair Fox Terrier
SOLD - 2010 R-25 LAXEY
Trade in 2016 Ranger Gray R-21EC LAXEY
Trade in R-27/OB, LAXEY, Hull Midnight Blue
2019 R29 CB IoM LAXEY, Hero Red
AIS 800, Radio Call Sign: WDK7354
Edmonds, WA
baz
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:28 am
City: Edmonds
State/Province: WA
Ranger/Cutwater Model: R-29 CB
Vessel Name: LAXEY
MMSI Number: 368083620

Re: The anatomy for decision making for a boat

Postby JamesTXSD on Sun Sep 23, 2018 5:23 pm

Sincere condolences. Knowing many guys whose wives don't want to boat, I have always felt fortunate to have a spouse who has been as invested as me in the things we do together. So sorry for your loss.

We all approach the boat buying decisions from different perspectives. Nice to hear about the decisions you made together. Your life and boating will certainly change going forward. Good luck with the decisions.
CD-25, Wild Blue
http://captnjim.blogspot.com/
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Re: The anatomy for decision making for a boat

Postby baz on Sun Sep 23, 2018 5:59 pm

Thanks James.... :)

I should add that in the past I've been no fan of having a dinghy on the swim step and the fact this is nigh impossible for the R-27/OB. I say this even though I had a Portland Pudgy on my R-25 Classic that got little use but had it for safety/emergency reasons and for its stability handling my 1st Mate's requirements at the time.

On the R-27/OB I've installed a nice inflatable Sea Eagle FasTrack 12-foot kayak on the cabin roof as an alternative to the swim step dinghy.

Since my recent life changes I'm now reconsidering having a dinghy on the swim step with the R-29 S. Yes it does obstruct rear views but my estimated use of the R-29 S dictates a dinghy to allow me to anchor out and get to shore as some of my friends have cabins on the PNW islands but have no docks. It will also be fun for my grandkids to mess around in as well as being a bit more suitable for my lively Wire Hair Fox Terrier who at times simply sees things in the water and wants to leap to get a closer look. :lol: A dinghy will also offer better stability and load carrying capabilities..... choices, choices, choices.... it never ends. :)
Barry & Jake-Wire Hair Fox Terrier
SOLD - 2010 R-25 LAXEY
Trade in 2016 Ranger Gray R-21EC LAXEY
Trade in R-27/OB, LAXEY, Hull Midnight Blue
2019 R29 CB IoM LAXEY, Hero Red
AIS 800, Radio Call Sign: WDK7354
Edmonds, WA
baz
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:28 am
City: Edmonds
State/Province: WA
Ranger/Cutwater Model: R-29 CB
Vessel Name: LAXEY
MMSI Number: 368083620

Re: The anatomy for decision making for a boat

Postby NorthernFocus on Sun Sep 23, 2018 11:49 pm

Condolences for your loss, Barry. I can't imagine what I'd so if I found myself in a similar situation.

Yes it is interesting how differently we all approach boating. Reasons for doing it, size requirements, fast vs slow, etc, etc. I hope you find what works for you going forward and enjoy many more years afloat with your grand kids.
Dan

Never confuse confidence for competence.
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Re: The anatomy for decision making for a boat

Postby baz on Tue Sep 25, 2018 7:15 pm

In considering my dinghy for the swim step I've discovered the best of two worlds; times when I have it installed and times when it's not required.

My marina allows me to tie up a dinghy alongside my boat in the slip so long as there's enough room between my boat and my neighbor. Thus, when the requirement for the dinghy to be attached is not necessary I can leave it at my Marina where my boat would normally be moored and enjoy the wonderful rear view in full on day trips or longer as required.

The only issue with this is that my Marina offers its customer with 'rent a space' which allows the Marina to rent out a slip when the boat is away. In the past this has been very cost-saving for me.
Barry & Jake-Wire Hair Fox Terrier
SOLD - 2010 R-25 LAXEY
Trade in 2016 Ranger Gray R-21EC LAXEY
Trade in R-27/OB, LAXEY, Hull Midnight Blue
2019 R29 CB IoM LAXEY, Hero Red
AIS 800, Radio Call Sign: WDK7354
Edmonds, WA
baz
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:28 am
City: Edmonds
State/Province: WA
Ranger/Cutwater Model: R-29 CB
Vessel Name: LAXEY
MMSI Number: 368083620

Re: The anatomy for decision making for a boat

Postby Shangie on Fri Mar 08, 2019 7:15 pm

Barry, Am a newer member but have enjoyed many of your well written and informative posts. The title of this story caught my eye and made me laugh and cry. I could really relate to your wife eyeing the larger boat. I am sorry you lost your first mate.
Shangie
 
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City: Bothell
State/Province: WA
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Re: The anatomy for decision making for a boat

Postby PACA1953 on Fri Mar 08, 2019 8:53 pm

Barry,
Thank you for your thoughtful AND thought provoking boat decision making post. Thanks as well for your input concerning my previous to buy or not to buy post. I understand now the reasons for your soulful insightfulness. I wish you continued success with the boating you enjoy! BTW aren’t those wire hairs a blast of a dog? My wife and I had our lovely Kayladog a wire haired fox terrier for 15 wonderful years, we have yet to be able to get a new dog after her. Continue best wishes, and looking forward to your future posts.
Best,
Keith
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Re: The anatomy for decision making for a boat

Postby RJM1953 on Sat Mar 09, 2019 12:32 pm

Hello Barry,
First, let me extend my best wishes to you and your family with regard to the loss of your 1st mate. While I am a new member here and am not looking to hijack your thread, I felt compelled to add my two-cents to some of the insightful and poignant points you have made. As a widower, my late wife grew up around boats and enjoyed the boating lifestyle. We eventually owned an Albin 43' trawler. As our daughter is totally blind in both eyes, it served us well as it was a very safe platform for her with its wide walk around decks and high handrails. As both my wife and I were both teachers, we spent all summers aboard her cruising all over Long Island Sound NY in great comfort and safety. We eventually decided to sell the Albin and look for a larger trawler such as a DeFever 49' pilothouse. As my Albin was in bristol condition, it sold quite readily and thus the quest for a replacement began. Unfortunately, life got in the way as my beloved wife was diagnosed with ovarian cancer and passed in a mere six weeks.

Fast forward to 2019. In an effort to jump-start my life again, two years ago I purchased a lovely townhouse right on the water in the Shippan Point section of Stamford CT, complete with a 40' boat slip. As I will be 66 years old in May, I have decided that I would get back into boating with one last hurrah..! The point of all of this is that as Barry pointed out, my needs, wants, and stature in life has dramatically changed. I want a boat with all the amenities and creature comforts of my well appointed Albin, but am totally cognizant that I need a boat that I can single-hand by myself. It is for that reason that after discovering Ranger Tugs at the Norwalk CT Boat Show this pas September, as well as the Tugnuts family, I am seriously considering the purchase of a new R-31 CB which I believe will give me the amenities I am desirous of in a package that I could handle by myself. I am currently in a dialogue with Peter Haywood of Winter Island Yacht Yard in Salem Massachusetts and will be heading up there as soon as the weather breaks to demo one in the water. My short list also includes both Nordic and American Tugs as well as a 35' Beneteau Swift Trawler, but I am really leaning towards the Ranger R31 CB.

We never know where life will take us as Barry pointed out in his original post, and despite our best intentions, often don't know where or when this journey will end. I thank Barry and all of the other members of this site for all of your posts as I have gleaned lots of information since joining!
Richie
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Re: The anatomy for decision making for a boat

Postby baz on Sat Mar 09, 2019 3:14 pm

Richie:

Thanks for your kind words. It helps the grief to spit out what's on one's mind after a loss.

My 1st Mate and I have been boating since before we married. In the UK we had two very small 1 berth cabin boats with noisy outboards that had to be cord pulled to start up. We travelled up and down the UK canals and worked the locks ourselves and being in the London area we plied some canals that simply tunneled through and under London city. On one occasion after exiting a very long dark narrow tunnel we popped out right onto the Thames just upstream of the Tower Bridge. It was getting dark and as we pushed under the Tower Bridge to find someplace to dock sirens erupted and the local Thames Police boat came alongside wanting to know what on earth we were doing without some Nav lights. Grinning sheepishly I told them we had unexpectedly exited the canal just behind us only to find ourselves here and wanted to dock. They looked kindly upon us and told us to follow them to a dock. The canal cruises were a blast and as things progressed we eventually found a group we could join to help crew a very nice old 75-foot Gaff rig schooner that had been left as a legacy for young people to learn sailing and navigating. I had been a member of a local Sea Cadet Corp so did know a few things before the sailing gigs. 1st Mate and I would join the schooner's crew on weekends, pay our 10 shillings for the weekend, have our Passports in hand and depart from Southampton in early Friday evenings and sail through the night over to France and return late Sunday or early Monday. This is how 1st Mate and I picked up our navigation skills and learned some French lingo at the French ports.

Later on after being married we came to the USA to live. Several years went by without a boat in sight, being landlocked. Being Brits and landlocked was an anathema to both of us and after some 10 years we made it over to the west coast's Seattle area, and so much closer to the waters (the sea that is). Boating was then far more possible for us and after a few years we bought our first Ranger Tug. Canal and sail cruising was put behind us as we wanted the open seas, and the PNW has plenty of it without a lot of continuous windy days.

1st Mate dealt with and recovered from two bouts of cancer and just after the 2nd bout was behind her the nasty Parkinson's took hold of her and simply sapped her appetite for food. Life is simply unfair at times. One can lead a 'clean' life but that is no guarantee for living to a ripe old age.

1st mate's parting words were... "Don't worry...", "Don't panic...", "Recall the good times...", "Enjoy as best you can...", "Life is for the living...".

1st Mate named our first Ranger Tug to be LAXEY (a town on the coast of the Isle of Man where she was born). Each Ranger Tug we bought continued with this name and my new R29 CB will carry the same name in her honor.

Take care... :)
Barry & Jake-Wire Hair Fox Terrier
SOLD - 2010 R-25 LAXEY
Trade in 2016 Ranger Gray R-21EC LAXEY
Trade in R-27/OB, LAXEY, Hull Midnight Blue
2019 R29 CB IoM LAXEY, Hero Red
AIS 800, Radio Call Sign: WDK7354
Edmonds, WA
baz
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:28 am
City: Edmonds
State/Province: WA
Ranger/Cutwater Model: R-29 CB
Vessel Name: LAXEY
MMSI Number: 368083620


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